How you can use mobile marketing to entice customers

July 8, 2015 in , ,

Mobile phones have become a huge part of our daily lives, and as a small business owner, you can take advantage of that fact.

Mobile phones have become a huge part of our daily lives, and as a small business owner, you can take advantage of that fact. For example, a report by the Consumer Electronics Association found that 58 percent of mobile shoppers are willing to share personal data with merchants to get coupons and discounts.

With this in mind, how can you, as a small business owner, make use of mobile marketing to draw in more customers?

Target customers
Businessweek recommended you eliminate any barriers that can make purchasing more difficult, as customers can be turned off by any website issues or hidden business information. While this might seem like an obvious task, a way to figure out what turns customers off is by offering surveys and asking for feedback. You might be surprised what is holding your enterprise back when you lack a mobile business plan.

Experiment and take risks
Entrepreneur suggested business owners take risks with mobile applications and websites. Creative ideas can make things really interesting for consumers. You can give customers coupons and discounts when they sign up for mobile alerts, which can encourage them to share the company’s information with their friends,  especially if it’s unique enough to make people talk. Businessweek reported that sweetening emails and ads through mobile marketing offers will also entice potential customers.

Work with emails and be personal
Text messages and emails have become popular ways to get a customer’s attention, but Businessweek recommended that you get to your point with as few words as possible. Consumers don’t want to take the time to figure out that there is a sale. An ad has to be concise and quick, so if a customer glances at it, he or she still gets the idea.

“Text messages work better for local marketing, which lends itself to small business,” John McGee, chief executive of OptifiNow, a Los Angeles sales and marketing company, told Businessweek. “If a local restaurant is having a slow night and sends a text to people nearby to get them in for a special, that’s more effective than a retail chain sending out messages to people 20 miles down the freeway.”

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